Term: CPEHR

Description: Stands for Certification for Professionals in Electronic Health Records. The designation of Certified Professional in Electronic Health Records (CPEHR) indicates that the holder has mastered the common body of knowledge covering planning, implementation, operation of EHR for knowledge management, quality improvement, patient safety, and care coordination. The CPEHR curriculum adjusts the strategies to make the most of an EHR investment, enhancing capabilities, using new technologies, and building value.

Planning and managing EHRs for healthcare practice is a challenging, yet rewarding, experience. Professional certification for those who must plan and manage EHRs conveys mastery of the body of knowledge that supports the clinical transformation necessary to achieve EHR benefits.

Applications:
Day 1:
8:30 am - Registration and Continental Breakfast
Core Content for Both CPEHR and CPHIT:
9:00 am - Overview of HIT and EHR
10:30 am - Break
10:45 am - Legal and Regulatory Aspects of HIT and EHR
12:15 pm - Lunch on Your Own
1:15 pm - HIT and EHR Migration Path
2:45 pm - Break
3:15 pm - Change Management for HIT and EHR
4:45 pm - Adjournment

Day 2:
CPEHR Track:
8:30 am - Data Management
10:00 am - Break
10:30 am - Patient Safety: CPOE, e-Rx, and BC-MAR
Noon - Lunch on Your Own
1:00 pm - Interoperability
2:30 pm - Break
3:00 pm - PHRs & Care Coordination
4:30 pm - Adjournment

Day 3:
CPEHR Track:
8:00 am - Clinical Decision Support
9:30 am - Break
10:00 am - Electronic Document Management Systems
11:30 am - Conclusion of CPEHR Training Program; Lunch on Your Own
CPEHR Certification Exam
1:00 pm - 3:00 pm - CPEHR Exam Administration


Web Resources:
http://www.healthitcertification.com/index.html

Related Terminology:
CPHIT, CPHIE, Electronic Health Record Certification, Health IT Certification

Citations/References:
http://www.healthitcertification.com/onsiteschedule.html

Graphics:

emr-fact-n-figure-9.gif
Source: Richard Hillestad, James Bigelow, Anthony Bower, Federico Girosi, Robin Meili, Richard Scoville, and Roger Taylor,
Can Electronic Medical Record Systems Transform Health Care? Potential Health Benefits, Savings, And Costs,
Health Affairs, Vol 24, Issue 5, 1103-1117