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H1N1 (Swine Flu)


Description:


During Spring 2009, the first influenza pandemic in 41 years occurred. On June 11, 2009, WHO, the World Health Organization, declared H1N1 a pandemic, raising the pandemic alert level to Phase 6, the highest level. The H1N1 influenza virus has reached a world wide scale with reports from over 200 cournties. Typically, the flu virus can infect only one species. In the case of the swine flu, it can affect species like pigs and birds. The disease is acquired by direct contact with other beings who have the virus. Fortunately, you can not be infected with the virus by simply eating pork. Swine flu is a respiratory disease caused by a virus. The virus is contagious and can spread from human to human. According to the CDC, the most efficient way to protect yourself from catching swine flu is to wash your hands frequently and avoid direct contact with other humans. If you've become infected, stay home!

Symptoms:
  • Fever
  • Coughing and/or sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Headaches and/or body aches
  • Chills
  • Fatigue
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea

More information:

According to Harvard Health Publications, as of October 5, 2009, there have been 1,379 deaths and 16,147 hospitalizations attributed to H1N1. The swine flu is mostly affecting younger generations, unlike normal variations of influenza. This group should take special caution against the virus. Children 6 months to 9 years will need two doses of the vaccine, while ages 10 and older will only require one.

According to the CDC, as of October 14, 2009, there were a just shy of 6 million doses of the H1N1 vaccine shipped around the United States. Florida received around 243 thousand of these vaccines. The first rounds of doses are allocated toward high risk individuals such as health care staff. The rest will begin to trickle down into the remaining members of society. The federal government has purchased these doses of the vaccine and is providing it to state free of charge. If the vaccine is available in your area, you can most likely receive a dose for free or minimal charge due to processing fees.

Web Resources:
http://www.health.harvard.edu/topic/flu-resource-center
http://h1n1.fsu.edu/
http://www.cdc.gov/H1N1flu/
http://www.flu.gov
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/h1n1fluswineflu.html


Related Terminology:
Pandemic Flu
Influenza

Citations/References:
http://www.who.int/csr/resources/publications/swineflu/h1n1_guidelines_pharmaceutical_mngt.pdf
http://www.health.harvard.edu/flu-resource-center/swine-flu-updates.htm http://www.flu.gov/individualfamily/about/h1n1/index.html
http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/vaccination/vaccinesupply.htm http://www.examiner.com/examiner/x-8543-SF-Health-News-Examiner~y2009m5d7-H1N1-swine-flu-hits-young-adults-especially-hard

Graphics:

external image swine%20flu%203.jpg



external image B00526_H1N1_flu_med.jpg

external image B00528_H1N1_flu_med.jpg
[H1N1 virus, taken in CDC influenza lab]
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